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Is another 'Beast from the East' on the way?

Is another 'Beast from the East' on the way?

Last year the appropriately nicknamed weather front, ‘The Beast from the East’ hit the UK at the end of February and brought very low temperatures and heavy snowfall throughout the UK and Ireland. The Met Office issued a rare Red Warning, menaing there could be a potential risk to life. Almost everyone has tehir own story of how the weather affected them last year, and the winter of 2017/2018 will certainly be remembered for years to come. 

There have been many headlines over the past few weeks claiming that another ‘Beast from the East’ is due to happen again this year, due to a ‘triple polar vortex’, according to the Daily Express. While the weather forecast for the next few days is showing the mercury plummeting and snow on the horizon, how likely is it that we experience such a drastic weather front again?

The current forecast for this week is showing a blast of icy artic air that will bring freezing temperatures to the UK. This means overnight frost and snow is likely. The Met Office confirmed that a sudden stratospheric warming did happen on the 22nd of December that resulted in the winds around 30 km above the North Pole reversing from westerly to easterly which in turns weakens the UK’s prevailing mild winds; increasing the likelihood of unusually cold weather.

In the same article they go on to say that not all sudden stratospheric warmings lead to colder-than-normal conditions. Cold conditions are forecast for the UK in the next couple of weeks however nothing ‘extreme’ is so far confirmed. That being said, it is a good idea to be prepared for the coming cold snap. Keep your eye on the weather forecast and make sure you keep your rock salt stocks replenished, just in case.

Information taken from the Met Office website.